Skip to content

What do Humanists believe?

Humanism is a progressive philosophy of life that, without supernaturalism, affirms our ability and responsibility to lead ethical lives of personal fulfillment that aspire to the greater good of humanity.

Humanism and its aspirations: Humanist Manifesto III

First, what do Humanists believe? Truly, no two Humanists believe exactly the same thing. Like scientific knowledge, the rules we each choose to guide our actions every day adapt as we each learn more and consider the implications of what we learn, and no two of us learns the same things in the same way.

If you are looking for a Creed, “Humanism and Its Aspirations: Humanist Manifesto III” is a succinct and eloquent overview.


Regardless of one’s belief system, we’ve found that comfort, solace, and support, as well as longer and healthier lives, are ultimately found in community. “Ethical” Humanists believe that Non-Believers should have the same opportunities that religious folk have to laugh, learn, and build lasting, even lifelong, relationships with others of good intention. We’re Humanists who create and nurture community with others–locally and increasingly on line–much as others do in religious congregations, but without reference to supernatural beliefs.

And we “Ethicals” believe that Non-Believers should have the same opportunities that religious folk have to laugh, learn, and build lasting, even lifelong, relationships with others of good intention.

“Ethical Humanists” create and nurture communities that act for their members and friends as places of worship do, but without worship. have faith in the transformation of the human condition through personal and community effort. We strive to be more sensitive to the joy and suffering of others. Members join together in the struggle for social reform, a healthy environment, and peaceful world.

We’re like everyone else who are earnest, supportive, inquisitive, and teachable people. Every living thing is a cousin if we look back far enough on the family tree. We understand that the welfare of the natural community depends upon responsible human effort.

Our “golden rule” goes beyond the “Don’t do stuff you don’t like” and “Do stuff you like”, even the “What Would [name] Do?” versions, to this ideal:

Act so as to bring out the best in the other.

“Act so as to bring out the best in the other.” It’s an intention rather than an expectation. In a world of random and systematic micro-agressions, we make small changes–adding a micro-kindness here, a micro-assistance there, some micro-respect where it’s least expected–and find micro-benefits ourselves. And, by paying respect to all who and that surround us, we often feel feelings that some describe as religious and sacred.

Ethical Humanists believe that meaning and purpose are found through the process of redefining values and through acts of loving kindness. Comfort, solace and support are ultimately found in community and on this planet.